Muslim Library

Why Did Prophet Muhammad Marry Aisha the Young Girl?

  • Why Did Prophet Muhammad Marry Aisha the Young Girl?

    This is an important book talks about a common issue misunderstood but misused by lots of thinkers and orientalists. It is “Why did Prophet Muhammad marry Aisha the young girl?” The author shows the reason behind their discussion. They want to distort the picture of Prophet Muhammad not criticize the marriage of young girl. Also if this kind of marriage was strange, why did not the disbelievers of Quraish use it as a pretext against Muhammad?! The author discusses other topics such as: Europe also allows marrying young girls, the age of consent in most countries worldwide.

    Publisher: http://www.rasoulallah.net - Website of Rasoulullah (peace be upon him)

    Source: http://www.islamhouse.com/p/330161

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